22 Tricolor Dog Breeds (With Photos)


Tricolor Dog Breeds

Dogs are not only loved for their breeds and personality but also their looks. With many people looking to get into the canine event world, specifically the show dog gig, it’s essential that you have a well-manicured and beautiful pet. Of course, beauty is subjective, but many people have taken a liking to the tri-color breeds, which we have listed here.

Here is a list of tri-colored dog breeds:

  1. Chihuahua
  2. Boxer
  3. Pomeranian
  4. Cocker Spaniel
  5. Smooth Collie
  6. Rough Collie
  7. English Bulldog
  8. Pembroke Welsh Corgi
  9. Bernese Mountain Dog
  10. Australian Cattle Dog
  11. Australian Shepherd
  12. Papillon
  13. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel
  14. Panda Shepherd
  15. Entlebucher Mountain Dog
  16. Basenji
  17. Greater Swiss Mountain Dog
  18. Basset Hound
  19. Bull Terrier
  20. Shetland Sheepdog
  21. Border Collie
  22. Beagle

In this article, we will take you through 22 different canine breeds that feature tricolor dogs as well. We’ll also share a little bit of their personality as well so you know what their personality and demeanor are like alongside their beautiful coats.

1. Chihuahua

Chihuahuas come in three fur lengths: short and long. Solid white, solid black, brindle, and merles are the breed’s unusual hues and patterns, while fawn, cream, and red are some of the breed’s most prevalent coat colors. A black or blue mask may be included with your Chihuahua.

Moreover, there are several other markings that are accepted as far as the chihuahua breed goes. These markings mixed with the beautiful color combinations can make for a gorgeous puppy!

2. Boxer

Colors for boxer coats are limited. Fawn and brindle are the two colors listed in the American Kennel Club standard. White marks are prevalent; in some instances, the entire body is covered with white.

A black mask is present on the muzzle of all purebred boxers, though white markings may partially or completely hide it. If your boxer is a mixed breed you will find that the black mask may not even be present at all.

3. Pomeranian

Pomeranians come in a variety of colors, including bright orange, black, and trademark beaver color. Beautiful multicolor combos with brindle and merle characteristics, as well as the regal agouti and sleek glossy fur variations, are available in Pomeranians.

Any Pomeranian with more than a little patch of white (that might be defined as a marking, such as black with white marking) will be categorized as a parti (two colors in the coat, and the AKC prefers that one of the colors is white).

Parti Poms are quite popular because each dog is unique and the patterns may be quite striking. If the colors did not fall ‘properly,’ several dog breeds deducted points.

4. Cocker Spaniel

The well-groomed Cocker Spaniel is one of the most attractive breeds. Short on the head and back, but long on the ears, chest, belly, and legs, his thick, occasionally wavy coat is short on the head and back and long on the ears, chest, abdomen, and legs.

A solid color coat (black or light cream to red to brown) or a parti-color coat (black or light cream to red to brown) is available (two or more colors, including white).

5. Smooth Collie

Brown (sable) and black are the two basic color genes in collies (tri-color). Most of us are aware that brown is dominant and black is recessive in our breed. Each parent contributes one color gene to the puppy.

As a result, if a collie inherits a dominant brown gene from both parents, he or she is considered “pure for sable” (homozygous for brown).

6. Rough Collie

The smooth, rough, and border collie all have the same color variations, including tri-color. If each parent contributes a recessive black gene, the collie will be a tri-color (homozygous for black).

Tri-factored sable collies acquire a brown gene from one parent and a black gene from the other (still brown, but genetically it’s heterozygous).

7. English Bulldog

English Bulldogs are loving, short-snouted, slobbery doggie pals who make excellent household pets and are fantastic with kids.

While their normal hues are red, fawn, fallow, and white,  they also come in a variety of non-standard hues, such as several tri-color combinations, lilac, blue and black. Tri-color Bulldogs are pretty rare, which is why they are so expensive.

8. Pembroke Welsh Corgi

Red, sable, fawn, black, and tan, or Tris, are the five coat colors recognized in Pembroke Welsh Corgis. White marks may or may not be present. Tris can have either black or red hair.

Long hair, mismarks (too much white), and bluies (flushed out coat color with a sooty appearance – NOT Merles) are all regarded flaws, and these pups are not allowed to compete. Cardigan Welsh Corgis have coat colors such as merles and brindles.

9. Bernese Mountain Dog

A thick double coat with a longer outer coat and a wooly undercoat, the Berner coat is stunning. The bulk of the Berner’s body is covered with jet-black hairs with rich rust and dazzling white, giving it its distinctive tricolor appearance.

There is generally an inverted cross-shaped white marking on the chest, a white blaze in between both eyelids, and white on the posterior end.

10. Australian Cattle Dog

Australian Cattle Dogs have two primary coat colors: red and blue, which is why they are known as red heelers and blue heelers, respectively. These two coat colors of Australian Cattle Dogs can be further divided into two types: spotted and mottled.

Even the shade of this breed’s coat isn’t a fluke; it represents a useful function from the past. The black coat color rendered them “invisible” at night, according to an article in the AKC Gazette, which prevented the cows from being startled.

11. Australian Shepherd

Blue merle, red merle, red, tri-color (white, black, and tan), and black Australian Shepherds are available in a variety of hues. Merles have a patchwork of dark blotches against a lighter backdrop, so a blue merle dog will have black patches on gray while a red merle dog will have red patches on beige. They also tend to darken as they get older.

12. Papillon

The coats of regular Papillons are always particolored. Papillons, to be more precise, have a white base fur with patches of various colors.

White and black, white and lemon, white and red, white and sable, and white, black, and tan are the five standard coat colors for Papillon, according to the AKC.

13. Cavalier King Charles Spaniel

There are only four recognized colors for Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. The Blenheim is by far the most prevalent, while the black and tan are the most uncommon and consequently most expensive.

However, based on what we’ve gathered, Cavaliers are also available in five more non-official hues and patterns, including tan, black & white, and merle.

14. Panda Shepherd

The Panda Shepherd is a German Shepherd with a piebald coat. It’s well-balanced and highly resistant. Piebald coloration has only been seen in one GSD lineage. It is 35 percent white, with the rest being black and tan, with no white German Shepherds in its pedigree.

15. Entlebucher Mountain Dog

The coat of the Entle is thick, heavy, and multicolored. White on the chest, all four feet, and the tip of the tail, as well as a white blaze from the muzzle to the top of the head, make up the majority of the coloring.

Rust-colored areas appear between the black and white. They have a top coat and a dense undercoat. Brushing your dog once a week will help keep shedding to a minimum.

16. Basenji

The Basenji is an indigenous African hunting dog that has coexisted with humans in Central African rainforests for thousands of years.

Light tan, fawn, red and white, or black and white, barkless, prick-eared, curly-tailed hunting dogs held by native tribesmen in various parts of Central Africa were described by early English and European explorers.

17. Greater Swiss Mountain Dog

The Greater Swiss Mountain Dog has a dense coat with distinctive black, red, and white markings. It is a huge, extremely strong worker. Herders, drafters, and all-around pasture dogs, Swissies earned their keep by working as herders, drafters, and all-around pasture dogs.

18. Basset Hound

Most people link Basset Hounds with the colors black, tan, and white since they are known as the Hush Puppies. While the Basset Hound is a classic coat, it is available in a number of hues.

Basset hound dogs come in a variety of colors and markings, which can be regarded as unpleasant at times. Unlike other hunting dogs, the basset can take on any color. They come in a variety of colors, including white, brown, and even black.

From lemon basset hounds to dark red basset hounds, the brown hue might vary. Because it is a recessive gene, the blue basset is quite unusual. Periscoping intestines, food and skin allergies, and baldness are all associated with the gene.

19. Bull Terrier

Bull terriers were created in the nineteenth century in England. The Bull Terrier was created in 1835 when an old English terrier and a bulldog were crossed. Later crossings to the Spanish Pointer produced a handsome, tough white dog, as did later crosses to the white English terrier and Dalmatian.

The white form of the species, known as “white cavaliers,” became a popular pet among the gentry in the mid-nineteenth century. Around 1900, crosses to the Staffordshire Bull Terrier reintroduced color.

The Bull Terrier’s coat is white, black, brindle, red, fawn, or tri-colored and is short and dense. The dogs are regarded as typical shedders. They have a lifespan of 10 to 12 years.

20. Shetland Sheepdog

Shelties have two coats, one on the outside and one on the inside. Because the undercoat is dense and short, the longer, harsher topcoat stands out against the body. The breed comes in three main colors, each with varying amounts of white and tan markings.

Sable comes in a variety of colors, from golden to mahogany. Or Merle Black Blue (blue-gray with black). A Sheltie that is more than 50% white or has a brindle coat isn’t suitable for the show ring, but his color has no bearing on his potential to be an excellent companion.

21. Border Collie

When it comes to the Border Collie, there are 17 different colors that are recognized by the AKC or American Kennel Club. These colors include:

  • White and blue merle
  • Red merle
  • White and blue
  • White and red
  • Black
  • Brindle
  • Gold
  • Red
  • Red Merle
  • Lilac
  • Sable Merle
  • Sable
  • Saddleback Sable
  • White and black
  • Blue merle
  • Blue
  • White and Red Merle
  • White ticked

However, there are nonstandard colors as well that are also recognized by the AKC, and those include white and seal, white and gold, white and sable, slate, and seal.

22. Beagle

Beagles are recognized by the American Kennel Club (AKC) as having 10 standard colors, with a total of twenty-five distinct Beagle hues.

There are various shades of each of these 25 colors. However, Black, red, blue, white, lemon, tan, fawn, and brown are the most common colors for Beagles. Beagles rarely come in a single shade; instead, this breed is known for presenting a diversity of colors on a single dog.

The majority of beagles are tri-colored, with these genes being dominant, yet bi-color Beagles do exist. As a result, the variety of Beagle hues appears to be limitless

Related Questions

Is brindle a tricolor?

Brindle is more of a pattern than a color, however, if it does have three different colors in it the dog may be considered a tri-color brindle. The brindle means that they have a tiger-like pattern of the colors in their coat.

Are all tricolor dogs female?

No, not all tricolor dogs are female. this happens equally to both male and female dogs. However, it is true that some dog breeds only have tricolor markings. Take the different Swiss Mountain Dog breeds, for example, you will never see a solid color on their coat.

Is brindle rare?

Brindle is not rare, however, it is caused by a recessive gene which makes it uncommon. However, in certain dog breeds such as the Pit Bull and Boxer, the brindle is highly common and are one of the more prevalent types of sub-breed within that breed.

Heather Robbins

Heather is an animal lover that has many of them herself. She currently has her Blue Nose Staffy named Bootsie, but she’s catered to many animals over the years including guinea pigs, alpacas, cockatiels, cockatoos, bunnies, chinchillas, hedgehogs, and more. She believes that knowledge should be the foundation of caring for any pet.

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