20 Dog Breeds That Start With ‘F’ (With Photos)


Dog Breeds That Start With 'F'

Canines are deemed a man’s best friend, which is why many families adopt one of these four-legged creatures into their family. However, it’s always best to do research on the breeds first. Therefore, we’ve included 20 different breeds that start with the letter F to keep it a bit organized for you.

The breeds that start with the letter F that we’ll talk about in this article include:

  1. Farm Collie
  2. Fauve De Bretagne
  3. Feist
  4. Field Spaniel
  5. Fila Brasileiro
  6. Finnish Hound
  7. Finnish Lapphund
  8. Finnish Spitz
  9. Flat-Coated Retriever
  10. Formosan Mountain Dog
  11. Foxhound
  12. Fox Terrier
  13. Foxy Rat Terrier
  14. Foxy Russell
  15. French Brittany Spaniel
  16. French Bulldog
  17. French Mastiff
  18. French Pointing Dog
  19. French Pug
  20. French Spaniel

Let’s take a look at some of these different breeds and talk a little about each one so you can get an idea of what they’re like. Then, you can decide on the best breed for you and your family.

1. Farm Collie

By the 1980s, the Scotch Collie was on the verge of extinction, and a few determined individuals, like J. Richard McDuffie and Erika DuBois, set out to find them.

Their enthusiasm sparked others’, and with the dawn of the internet in the nineties, people from all over the nation gathered to debate and collaborated on these dogs.

It was about this time, the name “farm collie” was coined to describe these dogs.  There was a lot of excitement and activity online in the late 1990s, but it seems to have waned in the subsequent years.

2. Fauve De Bretagne

Following the French Revolution, commoners adopted this dog breed to assist them in hunting. They required a slower dog that could track and hunt animals while still moving at a speed that allowed people to keep up with them because they pursued on foot.

Basset Fauve de Bretagnes are wonderful pets for people of all ages. In such a compact and strong frame, they pack a lot of punch. These hound dogs enjoy being outside, as they were bred to hunt with their human counterparts. They’re also highly brilliant, so mental stimulation is just as crucial to them as physical activity.

3. Feist

Most breeds are bred to perform specific tasks, such as assisting farmers or hunting. The feist breed is renowned for its pinpoint accuracy in hunting or tracking mice and even bigger wildlife.

Feists are not only well-liked in the South for their abilities, but they also play a significant role in the history and literary works of the region.

There are a few textual mentions and movies that note or include Feist dogs, including Abraham Lincoln and George Washington. During hunts, Lincoln’s poem “The Bear Hunt” describes a little dog with incredible savagery.

4. Field Spaniel

Consider the Field Spaniel if you and your busy family are seeking a medium-sized dog with plenty of activity. He is slightly bigger than an English Cocker Spaniel and somewhat smaller than an English Springer Spaniel.

He’ll provide you with years of competing in dog sports such as obedience, agility, rally, tracking, hunt assessments, and conformation if you can meet his needs for exercise, training, and companionship. Hunters will appreciate their ability to quarter in dense cover — he hunts by zigzagging through the thick brush — and flush birds like pheasants, quail, and chukars.

While they may be cautious among newcomers, they should never be afraid, shy, or violent. Although some Field Spaniels form strong bonds with a single family member, the majority regard everyone in the household as their best buddy.

They’re great with kids, but they don’t like hard, boisterous play and would rather go away and do something quieter. Field Spaniels are attentive when visitors arrive and bark a warning, although they are not guard dogs.

5. Fila Brasileiro

Plantation owners utilized these giant dogs to keep large predators like jaguars at bay. They were also used for hunting, tracking down livestock such as cows, as well as runaway enslaved persons from the plantations, and grabbing them by the neck and forcing them to stay until the puppy’s master came.

These guard dogs are agile despite their large size. When relaxing with the family, the Fila Brasileiro could chase down their plantation owners at speeds of up to 35 miles per hour, then switch to a relaxed, gentle mode.

Only a few people are actually up to the task of rearing and socializing the Fila Brasileiro, which is one of the world’s most prominent and most headstrong purebred canines.

Because the Brazilian Mastiff was designed to be devoted primarily to their owners, constant and early socialization is essential for rearing a Fila Brasileiro that will not grow hostile towards strangers or visitors.

6. Finnish Hound

The Finnish Hound is an authentic working dog that is rarely kept as a pet and is seldom seen as a show dog, but it is still a recognized hunter in Scandinavia.

They’re commonly employed to hunt bunnies, foxes, mountain lions, and even moose. They prefer to work alone and follow odors in the air or on the ground, enthusiastically chasing their target while barking loudly.

They are pretty rare outside of Finland and Sweden. However, they are frequently cited as one of the top three most popular dog breeds in Finland, and they are undoubtedly the most popular scent hound.

It’s important to note that the Finnish Hound is a faithful working dog, unlike other modern dog breeds. They are usually housed with other scent hounds, and they do well in the company of other dogs.

7. Finnish Lapphund

The Finnish Lapphund is a bright and quick learner who makes excellent alert dogs, is a superb family companion, and is often referred to as a clown. However, not every dog is appropriate for every scenario and environment, and the Lappy, like any other breed, is not for everyone.

8. Finnish Spitz

Although the origins of the Finnish Spitz are unknown, dogs of this breed have been employed for hunting deer in Finland for centuries.

Spitz-type dogs are said to have been brought to Finland by tribes of Finno-Ugrian people who migrated there a few thousand years ago. They primarily utilized the dogs as all-around hunting dogs. The Finnish Spitz breed originated with little impact from other breeds because of their isolation.

9. Flat-Coated Retriever

At first look, the Flat-Coated Retriever may appear to be black or brown Golden Retriever; however, this is not the case. 
He’s unique breed that was created as dual-purpose game retriever on land and in water. 
Before World War I, this breed became popular pretty early but then was replaced with the Labrador and Golden Retrievers. However, fans of this breed appreciate the breed getting cast aside because they love keeping the secret of his hardworking yet fun personality.

10. Formosan Mountain Dog

The Taiwan Dog’s ancestral predecessors are thought to have been semi-wild canines who traversed the strait from mainland Asia to the island of Taiwan alongside Taiwan Aboriginals. Some scholars believe that dogs were on the island long before humans did, possibly as long as 10,000 to 20,000 years ago.

Taiwan Dogs tend to be suspicious of strangers or new acquaintances since they grow so close to their humans. Unwanted stranger aggressiveness can be mitigated with proper socializing training.

On the other hand, the Taiwan Dog could be the breed for you if you’re seeking a watchdog who will warn you of any potential danger.

11. Fox Hound

Because of their energy and love of running, American Foxhounds make incredible jogging partners for active pet parents. Their calm disposition makes them excellent family dogs, as long as they get the exercise they need.

Apartment dwellers and inexperienced pet owners should be wary of these low-maintenance, affectionate dogs. Because of this breed’s high energy and intensity, they require plenty of room to run and plenty of active playtimes.

12. Fox Terrier

Fox Terriers were once employed to “bolt” foxes and force them toward foxhounds and hunters when they rushed into their hiding places. Because they were less likely to be mistaken for a fox, white Smooth Fox Terriers were highly valued.

Wirehaired Terriers were preferred for hunts in uneven terrain because their coat made them least vulnerable to injuries than smooth-coated relatives. Although Fox Terriers are no longer employed for hunts, they have a powerful prey instinct and will burrow for underground pests

13. Foxy Rat Terrier

The Foxy Rat Terrier has a lot of qualities to admire. He’s outgoing and eager to demonstrate his affection. This characteristic is shared by both his father breeds, the Toy Fox Terrier and the Rat Terrier.

It’s one of the things that makes this dog so endearing. He’s also a curious dog who enjoys exploring his surroundings. It’s probably due to his past as a rat hunter, hence the moniker.

As a result, the Foxy Rat Terrier is a rambunctious puppy who is ready to chase anything at any time. With his antics, his enthusiasm also takes center stage. He enjoys performing in front of an audience and will do so on cue.

14. Foxy Russell

The Foxy Russell is a cross between the Jack Russell Terrier and the Toy Fox Terrier that is protective and loving. The Foxy Russell is regarded as a devoted, excitable, and curious explorer who enjoys digging holes and leading the way.

This dog’s middle name is “adventure.” He has a reputation for being a bothersome barker, which can be reduced with initial training.

The Foxy Russell’s coat is often short, rough, and tough, so he may need some additional grooming to stay looking stylish and sleek. This spirited hybrid’s owners think he’s well worth the effort and is a caring and entertaining buddy.

15. French Brittany Spaniel

The Brittany is a joyful, graceful gundog that has been described as both energetic and the ideal family companion. The reality is determined by your own personal interests and levels of engagement.

Like many sporting breeds, the Brittany has boundless energy – he’s the dog equivalent of the Energizer Bunny — and this, combined with his other attributes, can make him a fantastic fit for the right home.

16. French Bulldog

Frenchies are affectionate pets who delight in human interaction. The Frenchie is not the breed for you if you desire an outdoor dog that can be left alone for lengthy periods of time. This is a dog who enjoys showering affection on his human partners as much as he appreciates receiving it.

They get along with everyone, especially youngsters, generally. However, in the company of other dogs, they might be territorial and possessive of their owners. This breed requires a lot of socialization, but it’s a fun effort, thanks to their easy companionship.

17. French Mastiff

Until disturbed, the French Mastiff, often known as the Dogue de Bordeaux, is quiet, peaceful, and comfortable. Do not be fooled by his size. When required, he can be shockingly agile and speedy.

This isn’t your typical apartment dog. He needs some space and modest daily exercise to stay in shape. However, above all, he requires face-to-face engagement.

18. French Pointing Dog

The French Pointing Dog is a loving and peaceful family friend. They are passionate, careful, poised, loyal, and clever when hunting. They adapt to a wide range of terrains and game with astonishing ease.

This pointing dog may be trained quickly and effortlessly. They are people-oriented and will not be content if they are separated from their family. Human leadership is required. Owners must be firm, confident, and follow the regulations consistently.

19. French Pug

The French Pug is a mixed-breed dog, not a purebred. It’s a hybrid of both a Pug and a French Bulldog. The easiest method to figure out a mixed breed’s temperament is to look up all of the breeds involved in the cross and remember that you can obtain any mixture of any of the traits seen in each breed.

Not all of the designer blended dogs that are being bred are 50 percent purebred or more purebred. Multi-generation mixes are quite prevalent among breeders.

20. French Spaniel

The French Spaniel enjoys being active and playing. They enjoy playing games like “fetch” and going for long walks, but they are not fond of being cuddled. These puppies are athletic and quick.

Training them is quite simple because they are bright, peaceful, and eager to please their pet parents. Strangers are welcomed with open arms unless they detect danger, in which case they will bark. Apart from that, things are relatively peaceful.

Heather Robbins

Heather is an animal lover that has many of them herself. She currently has her Blue Nose Staffy named Bootsie, but she’s catered to many animals over the years including guinea pigs, alpacas, cockatiels, cockatoos, bunnies, chinchillas, hedgehogs, and more. She believes that knowledge should be the foundation of caring for any pet.

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