Do Pugs Shed? (Yes They Do, Here Is Why!)


Dog pugs shed

Pugs are so cute with their large personalities in their little bodies and scrunched-up faces. They’re one of those breeds that so many are sure they want, but one thing they forget to check into is whether or not pugs shed. Therefore, do pugs shed, and if so, how much?

Pugs, like all dogs, have a tendency to shed. They’ll leave bits of themselves on your clothes and furniture. Single and double coats are both possible in pugs. Because they have more hair, double-coated Pugs will shed more than single-coated Pugs. The frequency of your Pug’s shedding depends on the time of year.

In this article, we’ll talk about the Pugs shedding habits as well as what their coat is actually like. This will help you understand more about this breed to figure out whether or not it is the type of dog that’s ideal for you and your family. Let’s get started!

About The Pugs Coat

Pugs can be single-coated or double-coated, as previously stated. They’re also available in a variety of hues. Pugs come in a variety of colors, including black, fawn, apricot, and silver fawn.

White Pugs do occur, however, they have a type of Albinism rather than a true white coat like other breeds. If a breeder is trying to sell you a white pug, you should suspect the dog’s validity unless it’s a real albino puppy.

The most common coat colors for double-coated Pugs are fawn, apricot, or silver fawn. The majority of black pugs have single coats, which means they shed less. If you want a Pug but don’t want a heavy shedder, the Black Pug is your best option.

Keep in mind that black pugs are more uncommon than fawn pugs. Even unusual are apricot and silver pugs. If you’re searching for a show dog, the AKC only accepts black and fawn coats, so keep that in mind.

Why Do Pugs Shed So Much?

Pugs shed a lot of hair. This is because, in comparison to other breeds, they have more hair packed into their tiny frames per square inch of their bodies. As a result, they are more likely to shed.

However, this should not stop you from purchasing one. There are techniques to keep their shedding to a minimum, and they shed in similar proportions to other tiny breeds.

Black Pugs, as previously stated, are more likely to have single coats. As a result, they have less hair on their bodies than double-coated puppies. They will shed less regularly and are less inclined to blow their coats twice a year. If you can’t have fur in your home but know the Pug is the breed for you, consider buying a black Pug if you can afford it.

When Do Pugs Shed?

Pugs do shed all year long. During the two times a year when they “blow their coat,” double-coated Pugs shed much more. When a dog blows its coat, it means that it loses its winter coat in the summer and its summer coat in the winter.

Because dogs require a thicker coat in the winter, the Pug will develop a smaller but dense undercoat in the fall. This causes them to begin shedding during wintertime, as they build up their fur to keep warm.

When spring and summer begin to arrive, your double-coated Pug will be itching to shed all of his winter coat. This means you’ll have to keep up with frequent grooming to reduce the impact their shedding has on your house, clothes, and furniture. Single-coated Pugs won’t have this problem as bad because they shed their coats all year, making weekly grooming easy.

How To Manage Your Pugs Shedding Habits

So you either own a Pug or have your heart set on getting one. How do you deal with it? You may take some precautions ahead of time to reduce the impact of your Pug’s shedding on the rest of your house.

Brushing, bathing, providing a balanced diet, and supplementing as needed are all part of this process. You may also de-shed your Pug, although a thorough brushing will generally suffice. Because pug coats are shorter, deshedding them isn’t essential. Let’s take a look at each option for reducing Pug hair in your house and on your clothing.

Brush Your Pug

In every shedding situation, brushing is the second line of defense (the first being nutrition). During the summer and winter shedding seasons, we recommend brushing the Pug daily.

Brushing a double-coated Pug at least three times per week is suggested during nonshedding seasons. If you have a single-coated Pug, a weekly brushing should suffice to keep excessive amounts of hair off your furniture and out of your house. A regular pin or bristle brush is recommended for grooming a Pug.

Use The Right Shampoo

When it comes to washing, pugs are famously touchy. If you don’t use the appropriate shampoo formula, their skin may get inflamed. We usually advise using a nice oatmeal shampoo or a shampoo that is particularly designed for sensitive skin to soothe their skin.

Pugs’ skin is generally in rolls, which can cause chafing between the rolls. Using a strong shampoo, or even an anti-shed product, might leave chemicals behind that irritate them and provide no benefit.

We recommend bathing your Pug no more than once a month. Anything more than that will deplete the oils in their skin that they require to keep their coat healthy.

Feed Your Pug A Healthy Diet

Pug owners, like dog owners in general, sometimes ignore diet. The first line of defense in ensuring that your Pug’s shedding habits return to normal is nutrition. If at all feasible, feed them a high-quality food prepared particularly for Pugs.

Spending a little more on their diet now might help them avoid future skin irritation and poor coat condition. Look for a dry kibble with a high concentration of Omega 3 and Omega 6 fatty acids. This will help your dog’s skin and coat stay healthy, giving him a beautiful coat.

Use Legitimate Supplements

Supplements are beneficial to both the skin and the coat of the dog. Chewables have gained in popularity in recent years. They’re a cost-effective solution to keep your dog’s skin and coat healthy if their diet alone isn’t doing the trick. In most cases, we’d suggest looking for a supplement made particularly for skin and coat health.

There are numerous brands available, but any high-quality vitamin should suffice. If your dog doesn’t like chewable pills, try a liquid fish oil supplement. A few squirts of it on their food will benefit their skin and coat while also making their diet more appealing.

Check Out De-Shedding Products

Supplements are beneficial to both the skin and the coat of the dog. Chewables have gained in popularity in recent years. They’re a cost-effective solution to keep your dog’s skin and coat healthy if their diet alone isn’t doing the trick. In most cases, we’d suggest looking for a supplement made particularly for skin and coat health.

There are numerous brands available, but any high-quality vitamin should suffice. If your dog doesn’t like chewable pills, try a liquid fish oil supplement. A few squirts of it on their food will benefit their skin and coat while also making their diet more appealing.

How Much Is Too Much Shedding?

Even though shedding is a normal occurrence, there is such thing as too much shedding. But exactly how much is too much? If you notice that your Pug has bald spots, or that there’s more hair than usual, those are both causes for concern.

We advise in this case that you take your dog to the vet to see what’s going on. Typically, excessive shedding doesn’t happen unless your dog has a medical issue or some other sort of problem that needs to be assessed.

What Causes Excessive Shedding?

In Pugs, there are several causes of excessive shedding which include:

  • Thyroid problems
  • Inadequate nutrition
  • Pregnancy
  • Dry skin
  • Allergies to the environment or food
  • Cancer

Pugs are already prone to extremely sensitive skin, so it’s important that you’re keeping up on grooming him, as well as ensuring that you give him a supplement to keep the coat healthy. Also, your dog could have fleas, and be allergic to them which would also cause their fur to fall out.

What Supplements Make My Pug Stop Shedding?

Any type of product that is marketed toward stopping a dog from shedding is not something that you want to get. There’s no such thing as stopping a dog from shedding, and if there was, you shouldn’t, as it’s a natural part of their bodily regulation.

Dogs shed to allow the dead hairs out of their coat to stay cool during summer. Then in the winter, they will grow their coat back to stay warm. However, you could always give them a fish oil supplement to help with a healthy coat and skin to keep their shedding at a healthy level.

Heather Robbins

Heather is an animal lover that has many of them herself. She currently has her Blue Nose Staffy named Bootsie, but she’s catered to many animals over the years including guinea pigs, alpacas, cockatiels, cockatoos, bunnies, chinchillas, hedgehogs, and more. She believes that knowledge should be the foundation of caring for any pet.

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