Do Boxers Shed? (Yes, They Do, And Here’s Why!)


Do Boxers Shed?

Boxers are intelligent and energetic canines that are very social dogs. While their personalities match up with what you’re looking for in a family dog, their shedding habits may not. But, do Boxers even shed? If so, how much?

Boxers do shed quite a bit, but it can be controlled with a routine grooming regimen in order to minimize the fur lying around the house. If you are someone who suffers from pet allergies, a Boxer may not be the best breed that’s suitable for you and your family. 

Let’s take a deeper look into the shedding habits of Boxers so you know what you’re getting yourself into when you adopt a boxer. We’ll share some tips in controlling the shedding and making your environment ideal.

Do Boxers Shed?

Yes, Boxers shed, but they can groom themselves just like cats. They shed a lot, but frequent brushing can help to keep it under control. They may shed excessively during the shedding season, but by implementing adequate grooming procedures you can keep it to a minimum.

If you keep your boxer on a terrible grooming regimen or a bad nutritional plan, they will shed a lot and it will become unmanageable.

Even though they require weekly brushing regardless, this does not negate the importance of good care and a well-balanced nutritious diet.

Why Exactly Do Boxers Shed?

It doesn’t matter what kind of dog breed you have at home; every dog breed sheds at some point. Some shed a lot less, while others shed a lot more.

Boxers are the dog breed that sheds the least, but they still shed and, like any other breed, will need to shed to maintain their body temperature as the seasons change.

Yes, you read that correctly; every dog breed must lose some of its hair in order to maintain its body temperature in response to seasonal temperature variations.

If you’re wondering how, let me inform you that throughout the shedding season, Boxers are supposed to shed at their highest levels, which may be unmanageable.

That is why I always advise you to study every element of their shedding so that you know what to expect in the worst-case scenario.

What Are The Shedding Seasons For Boxers?

The shedding seasons happen twice a year, in the spring and the fall.

During the fall season, your Boxers will lose part of their hair to create space for new, thicker hair growth that will keep their bodies warm and comfortable during the winter.

This type of coat protects your Boxers’ skin and body and keeps it insulated during the cold months. In the spring, on the other hand, your Boxer will shed once more.

Boxers Regulate Their Own Bodies By Shedding

They will lose their winter coats in order to make their coats thinner, which will help them stay cooler in the summer. This type of coat keeps their bodies from overheating on hot summer days.

This is how your Boxer will regulate their body temperature, and there is nothing you can do to stop them completely from shedding.

However, while certain techniques can be quite beneficial to dog owners, none of them are successful enough to entirely eliminate shedding in Boxers.

You may be tempted to shave your dog, but believe me when I say that doing so will cause more harm than good. Your Boxers will be exposed to the elements such as snow, sunshine, and water if they don’t have a coat.

They may easily get overheated in the summer or hot and not be insulated in the winter, both of which can be fatal.

Abnormal Shedding In Boxers

There is certainly something wrong with your Boxer if you notice them shedding a lot of hair when it isn’t the proper time of year for them to shed.

An extraordinary quantity of shedding suggests that there may be an underlying health concern that needs to be addressed as soon as possible. Make an appointment with your veterinarian as soon as possible. Even though it is unlikely, you should keep an eye out for this type of shedding.

Balding and itching are other telltale indicators that your dog is having a bad shedding season. Here are some of the reasons why your Boxer may shed outside of the season.

  • Allergy to shampoo
  • Immune disease
  • Fungal infection
  • Bacterial infection
  • Kidney disease
  • Reaction to medication
  • Pregnancy or lactation
  • Sunburn
  • Cancer
  • Adrenal disease
  • Parasites
  • Thyroid disease
  • Liver disease
  • Reaction to supplements
  • Food allergy
  • Parasites or fleas

Tips For Controlling Shedding In Boxers

Here are a few pointers that will assist you in reducing your Boxer’s shedding and make you feel more at ease. So, let’s have a look at some of the methods that might help you keep your shedding to a minim.

Brush Your Boxer Daily

If at all feasible, brush your Boxer’s coat on a regular basis. If you don’t have a lot of time, brush your Boxers’ coat at least four times a week.

When you brush your dog’s coat, their skin releases natural oil on their body, which you can easily spread to other parts of their body with a good quality suggested brush, assisting them in hydrating their skin.

There would be less shedding if their skin is kept moisturized at all times. If their skin becomes dry, it is a sure indicator that they will shed more. Brush your Boxer’s coat in the direction of their hair growth at all times.

Bathe Your Puppy

Always wash your Boxer properly and use high-quality products. Bathe your Boxers seldom since they will shed more hair if they are bathed frequently. Bathing a boxer too regularly causes their skin to dry up, resulting in increased shedding.

Furthermore, it is advised to always use a good quality shampoo that can assist in moisturizing their skin, since their natural oil may easily be rinsed away with the water, and without a good quality shampoo, you will not be able to moisturize their skin right after the bath.

Some Additional Tips For Your Boxer’s Shedding

Here are several tips that will help you in controlling the shedding in your Boxer. This way, you can minimize the month of fur around your home and the hassle that comes with it all:

  • Do not shave your dog! Never shave your Boxers since they will be unable to protect themselves from the elements and will cause additional injury to your dog.
  • Brush your puppy outside. Brush your Boxer’s coat outside your house to guarantee that their hair does not accumulate inside and that the mess stays outside.
  • Do not allow your dog near your food. Allowing your Boxers in the kitchen is not a good idea since their hairs are so light and may easily move through the air and into your food.
  • Have them sleep in their own space. Designate one space for your Boxers to sleep because they shed a lot when sleeping, and you can pick up all the dead loose hair from the floor immediately in the morning before it spreads.
  • Train them to stay away while you eat. You truly want your dog to stay in one spot while you eat your lunch or supper so that their hairs don’t go into your food, train them on how to follow your orders.
  • Don’t allow your dogs on the furniture during shedding season. Always make sure you don’t keep or allow your Boxers to sit on the couch since their hair may quickly become trapped in the fabric and be difficult to remove afterward.
  • Wash your clothing. Always wash your clothes properly since their hair/fur can easily get caught on your material when you brush your Boxers, and it is vital to wear an apron that is free of their hair when you are preparing your meal.
  • Vacuum your home. Always vacuum your home thoroughly, making sure to vacuum every single corner because their hairs/fur can easily become stuck in the corners of your home. If you want to keep your Boxers in your house, you’ll need to vacuum on a regular basis.

Tools For Boxers Shedding

If you don’t want to deal with brushing your dog, and you can’t do it regularly. There is nothing you can do but buy a grooming glove and teach your children to use it. It can come in handy.

It’s simple to use, and instead of combing their coat for more than 15 minutes, you can do it in 5 minutes with this grooming glove. Simply put the glove over your hand and run your hand over your Boxers coat to complete the look.

You’ll be done removing all the dead hairs from their coat that were about to fall out right in your house in less than 5 minutes. Before you make them or allow them to roam around your house, make sure their hair is clean and brushed. This will cut down on their shedding in your home.

Heather Robbins

Heather is an animal lover that has many of them herself. She currently has her Blue Nose Staffy named Bootsie, but she’s catered to many animals over the years including guinea pigs, alpacas, cockatiels, cockatoos, bunnies, chinchillas, hedgehogs, and more. She believes that knowledge should be the foundation of caring for any pet.

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